Jamaican Man Accused of DUI in NY Left Counting US$1 Million

A Jamaican man has been awarded almost US$1 million or Ja$120 million after having been framed by cops in New York, USA on a drunk driving charge to cover up a collision for which one of the lawmen involved was culpable.

Coincidentally, the Jamaican, Oliver Wiggans, 33, ended up being freed and given the award after he could easily prove that he was framed, as he does not drink alcohol, and the result of a breathalyser test confirmed that instead of being drunk, he had no alcohol in his blood.

Oliver Wiggins

Reports in the US media indicated that cops tried to charge Oliver Wiggins with driving while intoxicated to cover up for a police officer who ran a marked SUV through a Brooklyn stop sign and ploughed into Wiggins’ car.

Wiggins was arrested and charged with impaired driving, resulting in his driver’s licence being suspended, and was forced to foot the repair bill for his 2004 Nissan Maxima that his insurance company declined to cover because of the supposed drunken driving.

This was despite the breathalyser test he took at the East Flatbush scene of the crash on April 19, 2015, having showed no alcohol in his blood.

His route out of the problems started while he was at hospital for treatment of a bad wound to one of his wrists after the crash, where Wiggins volunteered to have his blood tested for alcohol or drugs at the health facility. That test came back negative, with reports from the EMT and DWI technician each saying Wiggins had no sign of intoxication.

But that did not stop the arresting officer from officially reporting that Wiggins had slurred speech, watery eyes, an odor of alcohol on his breath, and was observed swaying.

Three months later, prosecutors dismissed the case, following which Wiggins filed a lawsuit in the Brooklyn Supreme Court against the city and the arresting officer, among a number of other cops who were involved in his arrest.

Interestingly, the experience has reportedly motivated Wiggins to become a correction officer in a bid to fairly enforce the law like his father does back in Jamaica.

His lawyer said the unpleasant experience had taught him to have great respect for and appreciation of the need to responsibly enforce the law and protect the innocent in the process.

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